The Plus Factor: How Women Are Reclaiming The Home As A Source Of Empowerment

When I first went freelance last year, moving from my beloved, snug-as-a-bug New York City East Village apartment (and 35-minute, two-subway-transfer office commute) to a lofty space in Chicago’s Wicker Park, the nerves surrounding my newfound boss status were systematically soothed by a sense of control that I suddenly felt over daily workflow—not to mention my actual work zone. But what surprised me most were the questions I fielded from friends and acquaintances, now less focused on wellness updates and instead a universal fascination: “What’s it like working from home? How long are your hours now? Where do you sit? Do you wear sweats all day? Do you love it?”

It’s as if, in 2018, kicking the traditional 9-to-5 desk job is the fantasy for professional women.

It’s as if, in 2018, kicking the traditional 9-to-5 desk job is the fantasy for professional women. In fact, the home, AKA the place our grandmothers were consigned to, has become a major vehicle for self-care and inspiration. For the “staying in is the new going out” generation, there’s real joy—and peace—to be found in decluttering, DIYing and designing everything from meditation nooks to shibori sheets.

This is the world, after all, in which an obscure Japanese organization expert can write a book with “life-changing” in the title—and it actually ends up being an understatement. (Marie Kondo rarely changes just one life, after all; she creates KonMari Method evangelists.) It’s also the place where you can whip up health tonics at will, and where you can get your sweat on (and this year, you won’t suffer from a lack of workout choices).

Another thing to be found at home, besides peace and joy? Boss business. In fact, the number of women-run businesses is growing 2.5 times the national average—and they’re way more likely to be run out of their homes than male-run businesses.

“Organizing a thoughtful, unique home space is a way to nurture yourself and open doors to explore other facets of your creativity.” —Elizabeth Tigar, interior designer

The movement away from rented studios and open floorplan offices to actual living room hearths is sweeping up everything from craft-focused pursuits (a recent study shows that 87 percent of Etsy sellers are women) to self-employed creatives and big-time business consultants. “The ‘home’ and things that were traditionally considered to be the women’s realm have really been democratized—honestly I think it’s about the arc of feminism and gender roles in the Western world,” offers Elizabeth Tigar, a Houston-based interior designer who maintains that working from home is delivering an empowering new creative outlet for productivity.

“Thanks to the DIY gospel of platforms like Pinterest and Instagram, more people are exposed to well-designed interiors, at all levels of lifestyle and budget. Life is busy, chaotic, and expensive, so your home (and office) can become something of an oasis. Organizing a thoughtful, unique home space is a way to nurture yourself and open doors to explore other facets of your creativity.”

A proponent for all things slow-processed and handmade in today’s on-demand, commodity-based world, Tigar even keeps up a casual passion project of irreverent cross stitch commissions under the name Most Mad & Moonly as a form of artistic therapy. “Now there’s value in things that take time—that are made by a human, for another human—and a whole economy behind it. People want something real, something connective.”

So, what does it look like, exactly, to master your career from the safety of an inspiring, nurturing home base?

Source : https://www.wellandgood.com/good-home/women-reclaiming-home-as-source-of-empowerment/

The Plus Factor: How women are reclaiming the home as a source of empowerment
Which meal deal has your ENTIRE daily 'bad fat' limit? Good Health analyses 12 lunchtime options that are anything but healthy
Health News - Los Angeles Times
Masters of their world
A journey of conversations
Female Breadwinners and Love in a New Economy
Magalir Mattum director Bramma on Jyothika-starrer: 'Women's empowerment has to start at home'
Grill power: women seize back the BBQ tongs
Use a Drone Simulator to Practice Before You Buy
Has the ‘Gujarat Model’ failed the smartphone generation?
[LIMITED STOCK!] Related eBay Products